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1 February 2009 There Is No Magic Fruit Fly Trap: Multiple Biological Factors Influence the Response of Adult Anastrepha ludens and Anastrepha obliqua (Diptera: Tephritidae) Individuals to MultiLure Traps Baited With BioLure or NuLure
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Abstract

Field-cage experiments were performed to determine the effectiveness of MultiLure traps (Better World MFG Inc., Fresno, CA) baited with NuLure (Miller Chemical and Fertilizer Corp., Hanover, PA) or BioLure (Suterra LLC, Inc., Bend, OR) in capturing individually marked Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens (Loew), and West Indian fruit fly, Anastrepha obliqua (Macquart) (Diptera: Tephritidae), of both sexes. Experimental treatments involved wild and laboratory-reared flies of varying ages (2–4 and 15–18 d) and dietary histories (sugar only, open fruit, open fruit plus chicken feces, and hydrolyzed protein mixed with sugar). Data were divided into two parts: total captures over a 24-h period and trap visits/landings, entrances into interior of trap ,and effective captures (i.e., drowning in liquid bait or water) over a 5-h detailed observation period (0600–1100 hours). The response to the two baits varied by fly species, gender, physiological state, age, and strain. Importantly, there were several highly significant interactions among these factors, underlining the complex nature of the response. The two baits differed in attractiveness for A. obliqua but not A. ludens. The effect of strain (wild versus laboratory flies) was significant for A. ludens but not A. obliqua. For effect of dietary history, adults of both species, irrespective of sex, were significantly less responsive to both baits when fed on a mixture of protein and sugar when compared with adults fed the other diets. Finally, we confirmed previous observations indicating that McPhail-type traps are quite inefficient. Considering the total 24-h fly tenure in the cage, and independent of bait treatment and fly type (i.e., strain, adult diet, gender and age), of a total of 2,880 A. obliqua and 2,880 A. ludens adults released into the field cages over the entire study (15 replicates), only 564 (19.6%) and 174 (6%) individuals, respectively, were effectively caught. When only considering the 5-h detailed observation period and independent of bait treatment and fly type, of a total of 785 marked flies that landed on traps (519 females and 266 males, respectively), only 10.3% (144 females and 59 males) and 20.8% (25 females and 18 males) A. obliqua and A. ludens individuals, respectively, ended up being effectively captured. We discuss the practical implications of these findings with respect to developing new baits and designing new traps and to the interpretation of capture results in the field.

© 2009 Entomological Society of America
Francisco Díaz-fleischer, José Arredondo, Salvador Flores, Pablo Montoya, and Martín Aluja "There Is No Magic Fruit Fly Trap: Multiple Biological Factors Influence the Response of Adult Anastrepha ludens and Anastrepha obliqua (Diptera: Tephritidae) Individuals to MultiLure Traps Baited With BioLure or NuLure," Journal of Economic Entomology 102(1), 86-94, (1 February 2009). https://doi.org/10.1603/029.102.0113
Received: 25 March 2008; Accepted: 1 July 2008; Published: 1 February 2009
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