Translator Disclaimer
1 August 2010 Temperature-Dependent Development and Emergence Pattern of Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) from Coffee Berries
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is the most important constrain for coffee production throughout the world. Knowledge on the emergence pattern of H. hampei females to infest new berries is crucial to effectively plan control measures. In this laboratory study, we assessed the development of immature stages and the emergence pattern of H. hampei females from the berries by exposing them to temperatures that are typical for high-altitude plantations (≥1,700 m above sea level [masl]) or when coffee is grown under shade trees (20–22°C), and optimum altitude plantations (1,200–1,600 masl) or nonshaded coffee (25–30°C). Fecundity and emergence pattern of H. hampei females from coffee berries varied with temperature. Temperature played a crucial role determining the rate of H. hampei development and therefore the emergence of the females to start a new infestation cycle. The emergence and colonization phases of new colonizing females in coffee plantations with mean temperatures of 20, 25, or 30°C would take place at different moments in the development of the coffee berries, and in some cases more than once. The implications of our findings for an improved, site-specific timing of control interventions against H. hampei are discussed.

© 2010 Entomological Society of America
Juliana Jaramillo, Adenirin Chabi-Olaye, and Christian Borgemeister "Temperature-Dependent Development and Emergence Pattern of Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) from Coffee Berries," Journal of Economic Entomology 103(4), (1 August 2010). https://doi.org/10.1603/EC09408
Received: 3 December 2009; Accepted: 1 March 2010; Published: 1 August 2010
JOURNAL ARTICLE
7 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top