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1 August 2001 Impact of Exposure Length and Pupal Source on Muscidifurax raptorellus and Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) Parasitism in a New York Poultry Facility
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Abstract

Commercially obtained Nasonia vitripennis Walker and Muscidifurax raptorellus Kogan & Legner were released weekly for 12 wk into a high-rise, caged-layer poultry house. After the release period, parasitoids were sampled using sentinel house fly (Musca domestica L.) pupae that were either laboratory-reared or field-collected as larvae and exposed for 2, 4, 7, and 14 d. Parasitoid-induced mortality was observed in 31% of laboratory colony pupae and in 26% of field-collected pupae, whereas successful parasitism rates of 48 and 51% were observed from these pupal sources, respectively. Parasitism was primarily by M. raptorellus (88%), and Muscidifurax raptor Girault & Sanders (11%), while N. vitripennis accounted for <1%. Percent female progeny ranged from 43% in M. raptorellus to 76% in N. vitripennis. Parasitoid emergence from 2-d exposed sentinel pupae was the lowest of all treatments. Parasitoid emergence from 7-d exposed sentinel pupae was the highest of all treatments. We found no differences between pupal source, suggesting that when sampling for M. raptor, M. raptorellus, and N. vitripennis, in poultry facilities, pupal source is not a confounding factor.

Phillip E. Kaufman, Stefan J. Long, and Donald A. Rutz "Impact of Exposure Length and Pupal Source on Muscidifurax raptorellus and Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) Parasitism in a New York Poultry Facility," Journal of Economic Entomology 94(4), 998-1003, (1 August 2001). https://doi.org/10.1603/0022-0493-94.4.998
Received: 21 February 2001; Accepted: 1 April 2001; Published: 1 August 2001
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