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1 June 2004 Ionizing Irradiation Quarantine Treatment Against Oriental Fruit Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in Ambient and Hypoxic Atmospheres
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Abstract

Oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck), is a pest of many rosaceous temperate fruits, including pomes, Malus spp., and stone fruits, Prunus spp., in much of the world. However, some areas are free of the pest, and shipments of fruit hosts from infested to noninfested areas may be regulated. Current quarantine treatments for oriental fruit moth include methyl bromide fumigation and cold storage for several weeks. Methyl bromide use is being restricted because it is a stratospheric ozone-depleting substance, and alternatives are sought. Cold is not tolerated by many hosts of oriental fruit moth. The objective of this research was to develop irradiation quarantine treatments against the pest under ambient and hypoxic storage conditions because some hosts of oriental fruit moth are stored in hypoxic atmospheres, and hypoxia is known to lessen the effects of irradiation. In ambient atmospheres, no adults emerged from 58,779 fifth instars (the most radiotolerant stage present in fruit) irradiated with a target dose of 200 Gy (195–232 Gy measured). In atmospheres flushed with nitrogen, 5.3% of adults emerged from 44,050 fifth instars irradiated with a target dose of 200 Gy (194–230 Gy measured), but they died at a faster rate than control adults and without laying eggs. A dose of 232 Gy (the maximum recorded when 200 Gy was targeted) is recommended to disinfest any fruit of oriental fruit moth under ambient and hypoxic atmospheres.

Guy J. Hallman "Ionizing Irradiation Quarantine Treatment Against Oriental Fruit Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in Ambient and Hypoxic Atmospheres," Journal of Economic Entomology 97(3), 824-827, (1 June 2004). https://doi.org/10.1603/0022-0493(2004)097[0824:IIQTAO]2.0.CO;2
Received: 16 December 2003; Accepted: 15 March 2004; Published: 1 June 2004
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