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1 October 2004 Yield Reduction in Brassica napus, B. rapa, B. juncea, and Sinapis alba Caused by Flea Beetle (Phyllotreta cruciferae (Goeze) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)) Infestation in Northern Idaho
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Abstract

Phyllotreta cruciferae is an important insect pest of spring-planted Brassica crops, especially during the seedling stage. To determine the effect of early season P. cruciferae infestation on seed yield, 10 genotypes from each of two canola species (Brassica napus L. and Brassica rapa L.) and two mustard species (Brassica juncea L. and Sinapis alba L.) were grown in 2 yr under three different P. cruciferae treatments: (1) no insecticide control; (2) foliar applications of endosulfan; and (3) carbofuran with seed at planting plus foliar application of carbaryl. Averaged over 10 genotypes, B. rapa showed most visible P. cruciferae injury and showed greatest yield reduction without insecticide application. Mustard species (S. alba and B. juncea) showed least visible injury and higher yield without insecticide compared with canola species (B. napus and B. rapa). Indeed, average seed yield of S. alba without insecticide was higher than either B. napus or B. rapa with most effective P. cruciferae control. Significant variation occurred within each species. A number of lines from B. napus, B. juncea, and S. alba showed less feeding injury and yield reduction as a result of P. cruciferae infestation compared with other lines from the same species examined, thus having potential genetic background for developing resistant cultivars.

Jack Brown, Joseph P. McCaffrey, Donna A. Brown, Bradley L. Harmon, and James B. Davis "Yield Reduction in Brassica napus, B. rapa, B. juncea, and Sinapis alba Caused by Flea Beetle (Phyllotreta cruciferae (Goeze) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)) Infestation in Northern Idaho," Journal of Economic Entomology 97(5), 1642-1647, (1 October 2004). https://doi.org/10.1603/0022-0493-97.5.1642
Received: 19 November 2002; Accepted: 1 July 2003; Published: 1 October 2004
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