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1 February 2005 Baseline Susceptibilities to Imidacloprid for Green Apple Aphid and Spirea Aphid (Homoptera: Aphididae) Collected from Apple in the Pacific Northwest
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Abstract

Susceptibilities to the neonicotinyl insecticide imidacloprid were determined for clones of apple aphid, Aphis pomi De Geer, and spirea aphid, Aphis spiraecola Patch, collected from conventional and organic apple orchards and from crab apple and wild apple in Washington state and British Columbia over a period of 6 yr. For aphids collected during 1996–1998, adults were dipped in test solutions by using the Food and Agriculture Organization protocol, and third instars and adults were reared on treated apple leaf disks. During the final 3 yr of study, bioassays involved only third instars on treated leaf material. Tests showed that A. spiraecola was significantly more tolerant to imidacloprid compared with A. pomi. Depending on the bioassay method and aphid developmental stage, average LC50 values for A. spiraecola were 4.4–5.7 times higher than those for A. pomi established under the same test conditions. Clones of both species from Washington were marginally more tolerant to imidacloprid than clones from British Columbia, but the differences were generally not significant. Average measures of susceptibility for clones from organic orchards or unsprayed trees also did not differ from those for clones from conventional orchards, and there was no evidence for increasing LC50 values over the 6 yr of study. Differences in susceptibility to insecticides between these two anatomically similar species should be considered during the testing of new products for use on apple.

D. Thomas Lowery, Michael J. Smirle, Robert G. Foottit, Cheryl L. Zurowski, and Elizabeth H. Beers Peryea "Baseline Susceptibilities to Imidacloprid for Green Apple Aphid and Spirea Aphid (Homoptera: Aphididae) Collected from Apple in the Pacific Northwest," Journal of Economic Entomology 98(1), 188-194, (1 February 2005). https://doi.org/10.1603/0022-0493-98.1.188
Received: 8 June 2004; Accepted: 1 November 2004; Published: 1 February 2005
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