Translator Disclaimer
1 December 2005 Phenotypic Variation in Adult Behavioral Response and Offspring Fitness in Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) in Response to Permethrin
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Phenotypic variation in behavioral response and physiological tolerance to permethrin was measured and compared between two populations of diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.). A field population from Celeryville, OH, and a laboratory population originally collected from Wooster, OH, were compared. In laboratory choice bioassays, females from both populations were less likely to oviposit on cabbage leaf disks and seedlings treated with permethrin. The oviposition-deterrent effect was positively related to permethrin concentration. The laboratory population was significantly more behaviorally responsive to the insecticide and showed a significantly greater avoidance than the field population of the highest concentration of permethrin tested (1.50 g [AI]/liter). The physiological response of each population was measured by feeding bioassays, and the laboratory population was physiologically more susceptible to the permethrin. Larvae from the laboratory population that were fed permethrin-treated leaves had significantly lower growth rate, higher mortality, and lower adult fecundity compared with larvae from the field population. These data suggest that female moths that are more behaviorally responsive to permethrin produce offspring that tend to be more susceptible to the same insecticide, at least for the populations tested. The relationship between adult behavioral response and larval physiological tolerance to permethrin is discussed.

Mustapha F. A. Jallow and Casey W. Hoy "Phenotypic Variation in Adult Behavioral Response and Offspring Fitness in Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) in Response to Permethrin," Journal of Economic Entomology 98(6), 2195-2202, (1 December 2005). https://doi.org/10.1603/0022-0493-98.6.2195
Received: 20 May 2005; Accepted: 1 July 2005; Published: 1 December 2005
JOURNAL ARTICLE
8 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top