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1 October 2000 BREEDING BIOLOGY OF THE WHITE-TAILED SABREWING AT TOBAGO, WEST INDIES
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Abstract

We summarize data on the breeding biology (based on seven nests) of the White-tailed Sabrewing (Campylopterus ensipennis; Trochilidae) at Tobago, West Indies. Breeding occurred during the dry season (February–April). Nests were placed 1.75–11 m high in small dicot trees, bamboo and palms in the forest interior, usually near streams. Two white eggs were laid in bulky (7–35-cm high), cup-shaped nests; one nest contained spines from a palm (Bactris sp.). The camouflaged nestlings were quiet. During the late nestling period, a female made 1.27 feeding trips/h (10.25 h of observation) to the nest; feeding sessions averaged 0.93 min with an average of 2.0 regurgitations/nestling, and recesses off the nest averaged 44.26 min. The female fed on arthropods and nectar, and vigorously defended the nestlings.

Floyd E. Hayes, Neville A. Trimm, Bryan Sanasie, and Richard P. ffrench "BREEDING BIOLOGY OF THE WHITE-TAILED SABREWING AT TOBAGO, WEST INDIES," Journal of Field Ornithology 71(4), 597-605, (1 October 2000). https://doi.org/10.1648/0273-8570-71.4.597
Received: 8 September 1998; Accepted: 1 May 1999; Published: 1 October 2000
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