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1 March 2002 A Laboratory Situation for Studying the Effects of Chemical and Visual Cues on Prey Trailing in Brown Treesnakes (Boiga irregularis)
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Abstract

Because of the deleterious effects of predation by nonnative brown treesnakes (Boiga irregularis) on of native vertebrates on the island of Guam, efforts have been focused on developing effective means of controlling B. irregularis and preventing its spread to neighboring islands. Past laboratory attempts to evaluate potential baits for trapping B. irregularis have often not agreed with field results. Here we present a new laboratory situation for studying effects of various baits on prey finding ability of B. irregularis that uses trailing latencies as a measure of bait efficacy. Our results show that B. irregularis will follow trails made by rodent blood, whole rodent carcasses, and synthetic bait compounds. However, snakes followed trails made by rodent carcasses and blood at a significantly faster rate than those made by synthetic bait compounds. Further, the presence of a visual distracter cue significantly increased trailing latencies. Implications of these results for trapping efforts are discussed.

C. Patrick Stark, David Chiszar, Kathryn E. Stiles, and Hobart M. Smith "A Laboratory Situation for Studying the Effects of Chemical and Visual Cues on Prey Trailing in Brown Treesnakes (Boiga irregularis)," Journal of Herpetology 36(1), 57-62, (1 March 2002). https://doi.org/10.1670/0022-1511(2002)036[0057:ALSFST]2.0.CO;2
Accepted: 1 May 2001; Published: 1 March 2002
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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