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1 April 2003 A Comparative Study of Loss and Regeneration of Lizard Tails
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Abstract

On the basis of degree of adaptation in tail autotomy, five lizard species studied on the same area in northeastern Kansas were arranged in a sequence of specialization. Eumeces obsoletus was the most specialized (hatchling tail conspicuously colored and behavior adapted to flaunt it); in Eumeces fasciatus also, the hatchling tail was conspicuously colored, but tail flaunting was less developed. In Cnemidophorus sexlineatus the hatchling tail was conspicuously colored but there was no tail flaunting. In Ophisaurus attenuatus, the tail was easily broken, but there was no special coloration or behavior to direct predator attack. In Crotaphytus collaris, the tail was neither conspicuous nor easily broken, and there was no regeneration.

Henry S. Fitch "A Comparative Study of Loss and Regeneration of Lizard Tails," Journal of Herpetology 37(2), 395-399, (1 April 2003). https://doi.org/10.1670/0022-1511(2003)037[0395:ACSOLA]2.0.CO;2
Accepted: 1 October 2002; Published: 1 April 2003
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