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1 March 2006 Population Densities of the Coquí, Eleutherodactylus coqui (Anura: Leptodactylidae) in Newly Invaded Hawaii and in Native Puerto Rico
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Abstract

Eleutherodactylus coqui was accidentally introduced to east Hawaii Island in the late 1980s and has since become established as scattered populations across the island. Mark-recapture study plots indicate that population size remains small for the first year after initial colonization. Plots in heavily forested areas where the Coquí has become well-established yield population estimates of frog density three times the estimates reported from native populations in Puerto Rico. Surveys of the Hilo area using sound pressure level meters found many loud chorusing populations producing sound pressure levels up to 73 dB suggesting that this frog will achieve high densities through broad areas of Hawaiian forest and towns. We suggest that the apparent lack of native or exotic predators in Hawaii and abundance of suitable retreat sites contribute to achievement of unusually high population densities of E. coqui in Hawaii compared with Puerto Rico.

Lawrence L. Woolbright, Arnold H. Hara, Christopher M. Jacobsen, William J. Mautz, and Francis L. Benevides "Population Densities of the Coquí, Eleutherodactylus coqui (Anura: Leptodactylidae) in Newly Invaded Hawaii and in Native Puerto Rico," Journal of Herpetology 40(1), 122-126, (1 March 2006). https://doi.org/10.1670/79-05W.1
Accepted: 1 December 2005; Published: 1 March 2006
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