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1 May 2000 SELECTION OF MULE DEER BY MOUNTAIN LIONS AND COYOTES: EFFECTS OF HUNTING STYLE, BODY SIZE, AND REPRODUCTIVE STATUS
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Abstract

Predation on mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) by mountain lions (Puma concolor) and coyotes (Canis latrans) was examined to test effects of hunting style and body size, and for mountain lions reproductive status, on selection of prey. Mountain lions, which hunt by stalking, selected ≤1-year-old mule deer as prey. Body condition of mule deer did not affect prey selection by coyotes or mountain lions, and both predators preyed upon females and older adult deer more often than expected based on the percentage of these groups in the population. Female mountain lions selected female deer, but male mountain lions did not. Female mountain lions without offspring, however, did not differ from male mountain lions in prey selection. Coyotes did not select for young deer. Female mountain lions with kittens were selective for young deer in late summer.

Becky M. Pierce, Vernon C. Bleich, and R. Terry Bowyer "SELECTION OF MULE DEER BY MOUNTAIN LIONS AND COYOTES: EFFECTS OF HUNTING STYLE, BODY SIZE, AND REPRODUCTIVE STATUS," Journal of Mammalogy 81(2), 462-472, (1 May 2000). https://doi.org/10.1644/1545-1542(2000)081<0462:SOMDBM>2.0.CO;2
Accepted: 4 September 1999; Published: 1 May 2000
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