Translator Disclaimer
1 November 2000 MAMMALIAN HAIR DIAMETER AS A POSSIBLE MECHANISM FOR HOST SPECIALIZATION IN CHEWING LICE
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

We examined the relationship between mammalian hair diameter and body mass at several taxonomic levels (interordinal, intrafamilial, intrageneric, and intraspecific) and showed a significant, positive allometric relationship between hair diameter and body size at all taxonomic levels examined. The allometric coefficient (α) ranged from 0.13 to 0.33. Within pocket gophers (Geomyidae), a significant positive relationship exists between hair diameter and rostral groove dimensions of their chewing lice, Geomydoecus, which use the rostral groove to grasp hairs of their host. Coupled with previous evidence of a strong allometric relationship between rostral groove width and louse body size, our findings suggest that hair diameter of the host is an important determinant of body size in chewing lice that parasitize pocket gophers.

David L. Reed, Mark S. Hafner, and Shannon K. Allen "MAMMALIAN HAIR DIAMETER AS A POSSIBLE MECHANISM FOR HOST SPECIALIZATION IN CHEWING LICE," Journal of Mammalogy 81(4), 999-1007, (1 November 2000). https://doi.org/10.1644/1545-1542(2000)081<0999:MHDAAP>2.0.CO;2
Received: 26 July 1999; Accepted: 15 February 2000; Published: 1 November 2000
JOURNAL ARTICLE
9 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top