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1 April 2007 FACTORS INFLUENCING HOME-RANGE SIZE OF FEMALE FLORIDA BLACK BEARS
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Abstract

The manner in which space is utilized by animals is influenced by several factors, including habitat quality and the distribution and abundance of resources. We used 4 years (2000–2003) of radiotelemetry data to investigate the space-use pattern of female Florida black bears (Ursus americanus floridanus) in the Ocala National Forest and an adjacent residential community of Lynne, north-central Florida. Annual home-range size (95% fixed kernel density estimator) ranged from 3.8 km2 to 126.9 km2, and averaged (± SE) 24.2 ± 3.55 km2. Home ranges were largest during 2000 when a drought led to a forest-wide mast failure, suggesting that abundance of food resources can substantially influence space-use pattern. Home-range sizes during autumn (19.92 ± 4.59 km2) were substantially larger than during summer (8.26 ± 0.99 km2). Although annual home-range size did not differ between the 2 study sites, home ranges in summer were smaller in Lynne (5.30 ± 1.01 km2) than in Ocala National Forest (9.82 ± 1.29 km2), whereas home ranges in autumn were twice as large in Lynne (35.76 ± 13.91 km2) as in Ocala National Forest (13.24 ± 1.80 km2). We suggest that site-specific differences in the size of seasonal home range are due to differences in habitat characteristics and the degree of habitat fragmentation between the 2 study sites.

Melissa A. Moyer, J. Walter McCown, and Madan K. Oli "FACTORS INFLUENCING HOME-RANGE SIZE OF FEMALE FLORIDA BLACK BEARS," Journal of Mammalogy 88(2), 468-476, (1 April 2007). https://doi.org/10.1644/06-MAMM-A-165R1.1
Accepted: 1 August 2006; Published: 1 April 2007
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