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1 May 2000 Aedes notoscriptus (Diptera: Culicidae) Survival and Dispersal Estimated by Mark-Release-Recapture in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
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Abstract

The survival and dispersal of adult Aedes notoscriptus (Skuse) were estimated in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, where this species has been identified as a vector of Ross River and Barmah Forest viruses and shown to be orally susceptible to dengue virus types 1–4. Standard mark-release-recapture methods were used. Before the field study, laboratory trials showed that marking Ae. notoscriptus with fluorescent powder had no effect on survivorship. Female recapture rates of 10.6 and 2.3% over an 8-d period were achieved for two cohorts of marked Ae. notoscriptus released at the same field site. No males were recaptured over the 8-d period. The probability of daily survival was calculated using the Saul model as 0.77 and 0.79 for blue- and pink-marked females, respectively. For blue- and pink-marked females, the mean distance traveled was 105.2 and 179.9 m, and the maximum distance traveled was 195 and 238 m, respectively. The results indicate that protected harborage sites and shade influenced the distribution of Ae. notoscriptus within the study site.

Tonya M. Watson, Allan Saul, and Brian H. Kay "Aedes notoscriptus (Diptera: Culicidae) Survival and Dispersal Estimated by Mark-Release-Recapture in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia," Journal of Medical Entomology 37(3), 380-384, (1 May 2000). https://doi.org/10.1603/0022-2585(2000)037[0380:ANDCSA]2.0.CO;2
Received: 30 December 1998; Accepted: 15 December 1999; Published: 1 May 2000
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