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1 November 2000 Diversity and Contribution of the Intestinal Bacterial Community to the Development of Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae) Larvae
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Abstract

The bacterial diversity in the intestinal tract of Musca domestica L. was examined in larvae collected from turkey bedding and corn silage. Aerobic culturing yielded 25 bacterial species, including 11 from larvae collected from turkey bedding and 14 from larvae collected from corn silage. Providencia rettgeri (Hadley, Elkins & Caldwell) was the only species common to both environments. Two mammalian pathogens, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (Pfeiffer) and Ochrobactrum anthropi (Holmes), were isolated from the larval intestinal tracts. The majority of isolates represented facultatively anaerobic heterotrophs capable of fermentation. The significance of these bacteria for development of house fly larvae was evaluated by bioassays on trypticase soy egg yolk agar. Pure cultures of individual bacterial species isolated from the intestinal tract of larvae from turkey bedding supported development of flies to a much greater extent than those isolated from larvae from corn silage. House fly development was best supported by a Streptococcus sanguis (White) isolate. The significance of bacteria for development of house flies is discussed.

L. Zurek, C. Schal, and D. W. Watson "Diversity and Contribution of the Intestinal Bacterial Community to the Development of Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae) Larvae," Journal of Medical Entomology 37(6), (1 November 2000). https://doi.org/10.1603/0022-2585-37.6.924
Received: 22 February 2000; Accepted: 1 July 2000; Published: 1 November 2000
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