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1 November 2002 Notes on Parasitism by Amblyomma humerale (Acari: Ixodidae) in the State of Rondônia, Western Amazon, Brazil
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Abstract

The tick Amblyomma humerale Koch is endemic to South America. All host records refer to the adult stage parasitizing tortoises, mostly yellow-footed tortoise, Geochelone denticulata (L.), and red-footed tortoise, Geochelone carbonaria (Spix). The current study reports the presence of A. humerale in the state of Rondônia, Brazil. A total of 215 adult ticks (201 males, 14 females) was collected from six G. denticulata in an Indian reserve and nine Geochelone sp. in rural Monte Negro County, giving an overall mean infestation of 14.3 ± 12.0 (range: 2–44) ticks per tortoise. Male ticks always outnumbered females on the host and nine tortoises had only male ticks. Male ticks were mostly attached in clusters on the ventral sides of the carapace near the anterior and posterior margins, and more rarely on the outer margin of the plastron. All females were found attached to the tortoise skin, at different sites such as head, neck, shoulders or legs. Male ticks were rarely observed attached to the body skin. Seven engorged nymphs collected on small vertebrates from Monte Negro County molted to adults of A. humerale. This included one nymph each on the seven-colored lizard, Plica plica (L.), green tree climber, Plica umbra (L.), and wide-foraging lizard, Kentropyx calcarata Spix, three nymphs on the common opossum, Didelphis marsupialis L., and one nymph on the silky anteater, Cyclopes didactylus L. These constitute the first host records for the immature stages of the tick A. humerale.

Marcelo B. Labruna, Luís Marcelo A. Camargo, Flávio A. Terrassini, Teresinha T. S. Schumaker, and Erney P. Camargo "Notes on Parasitism by Amblyomma humerale (Acari: Ixodidae) in the State of Rondônia, Western Amazon, Brazil," Journal of Medical Entomology 39(6), 814-817, (1 November 2002). https://doi.org/10.1603/0022-2585-39.6.814
Received: 2 April 2002; Accepted: 1 May 2002; Published: 1 November 2002
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