Translator Disclaimer
1 November 2005 Sentinel Pigeon Surveillance for West Nile Virus by Using Lard-Can Traps at Differing Elevations and Canopy Cover Classes
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Sentinel pigeons, Columba livia, were installed in lard-can traps at heights of 1.5 m and 7.6–9.1 m within differing canopy cover classes in New York City. Adult mosquitoes were collected weekly from July to October 2002, as were serum samples from each pigeon. Culex pipiens L. and Culex restuans Theobald comprised 97% of mosquitoes collected and were most numerous in canopy-level, forested traps. The West Nile virus (family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus, WNV) seroconversion rate was significantly greater for pigeons in canopy-level traps, although seroconversions occurred concurrently with human cases in the city and were of little prognostic value to public health agencies. Our results indicate that sentinel pigeons were most effective for monitoring enzootic transmission of WNV when placed in single-sentinel caging 7.6–9.1 m above ground level.

Carrie S. Deegan, Joseph E. Burns, Michael Huguenin, Eliza Y. Steinhaus, Nicholas A. Panella, Susan Beckett, and Nicholas Komar "Sentinel Pigeon Surveillance for West Nile Virus by Using Lard-Can Traps at Differing Elevations and Canopy Cover Classes," Journal of Medical Entomology 42(6), 1039-1044, (1 November 2005). https://doi.org/10.1603/0022-2585(2005)042[1039:SPSFWN]2.0.CO;2
Received: 8 September 2004; Accepted: 8 June 2005; Published: 1 November 2005
JOURNAL ARTICLE
6 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top