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1 November 2007 Observations and Larval Descriptions of Fleas (Siphonaptera: Ceratophyllidae, Ctenophthalmidae, Ishnopsyllidae) of the Southern Flying Squirrel, Little Brown Bat, and Brazilian Free-Tailed Bat (Mammalia: Rodentia, Chiroptera)
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Abstract

Larvae of the four fleas infesting nests of the southern flying squirrel, Glaucomys volans volans (L.) [Conorhinopsylla stanfordi Stewart, Epitedia faceta (Rothschild), Opisodasys pseudarctomys (Baker), and Orchopeas howardi (Baker)], and of the bat fleas Myodopsylla insignis (Rothschild) and Sternopsylla distincta texana (C. Fox), associated with the bats Myotis lucifugus (Le Conte) and Tadarida brasiliensis (I. Geof. St. Hilaire), respectively, are described. C. stanfordi has the second posterior-row seta on abdominal segments 1–5 at most one fourth the length of the first and third setae, but it is unique among the Leptopsyllini with five short setae in abdominal segment 9 anterior row. E. faceta has the straight line of anterior-row setae 2–5 on abdominal segment 1, which is diagnostic for Phalacropsyllini. O. howardi and O. pseudarctomys have three anterior-row setae on the anal comb, three ventrolatera1 setae on the anal segment (abdominal segment 10), and a narrow mandible with five or more teeth as other Ceratopyl1inae, but O. pseudarctomys is distinguishable from O. howardi because the first setae on the posterior row of the head is long (greater than one half the length of the third posterior-row setae), the ventral setae on abdominal segment 7 are different sizes, and the third anterior-row setae on abdominal segment 8 does not extend past the spiracle posterior to it. Bat flea larvae have six posterior-row setae on abdominal segments 1–9 with the anal comb anterior row with two or more setae; M. insignis has eight mandible teeth and S. distincta texana three to four.

Robert E. Elbel and Robert L. Bossard "Observations and Larval Descriptions of Fleas (Siphonaptera: Ceratophyllidae, Ctenophthalmidae, Ishnopsyllidae) of the Southern Flying Squirrel, Little Brown Bat, and Brazilian Free-Tailed Bat (Mammalia: Rodentia, Chiroptera)," Journal of Medical Entomology 44(6), 915-922, (1 November 2007). https://doi.org/10.1603/0022-2585(2007)44[915:OALDOF]2.0.CO;2
Received: 12 July 2006; Accepted: 23 July 2007; Published: 1 November 2007
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