Translator Disclaimer
1 November 2011 Ivermectin Acts as a Posteclosion Nymphicide by Reducing Blood Feeding of Human Head Lice (Anoplura: Pediculidae) that Hatched from Treated Eggs
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

The 0.5% ivermectin topical cream formulation was not directly ovicidal to treated eggs of head lice, as hatchability was not decreased. Nevertheless, the percent of hatched lice from treated eggs that took a blood meal significantly decreased (80–95%) compared with lice that hatched from untreated eggs and all treated lice died within 48 h of hatching, including those that fed. Dilutions of ivermectin formulation of 0.15 and 0.2 µg/ml, which were topically applied to 0–8 d old eggs, were not lethal to lice at 24 h posteclosion. However, 9 and 16% less lice fed when hatched from these treated eggs, respectively. Total [3H] inulin ingested by untreated first instars significantly increased over a 48 h feeding interval but was significantly less in instars that hatched from eggs receiving the 0.15 (36% less) and 0.2 (55% less) µg/ml ivermectin treatments compared with placebo. The reduced feeding that occurred after the 0.15 and 0.2 µg/ml ivermectin treatments occurred in the absence of mortality and suggests a unique mode of action of ivermectin on feeding that is separate from the mode of action of ivermectin leading to mortality. Failure of hatched instars to take a blood meal after egg treatments with formulated ivermectin is likely responsible for its action as a posteclosion nymphicide.

© 2011 Entomological Society of America
Joseph P. Strycharz, Noah M. Berge, Anna-Maria Alves, and J. Marshall Clark "Ivermectin Acts as a Posteclosion Nymphicide by Reducing Blood Feeding of Human Head Lice (Anoplura: Pediculidae) that Hatched from Treated Eggs," Journal of Medical Entomology 48(6), 1174-1182, (1 November 2011). https://doi.org/10.1603/ME11051
Received: 16 March 2011; Accepted: 1 August 2011; Published: 1 November 2011
JOURNAL ARTICLE
9 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top