Translator Disclaimer
1 September 2012 Efficacy of Residual Insecticide Biflex AquaMax Applied as Barrier Treatments for Managing Mosquito Populations in Suburban Residential Properties in Southeast Queensland
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

The pyrethroid insecticide Biflex AquaMax (bifenthrin) was evaluated for its ability to suppress coastal mosquito populations in a controlled suburban backyard study in Mango Hill, Queensland, Australia. The insecticide was applied to perimeter vegetation, fencing in selected backyards, or both, and mosquito populations were monitored weekly from 3 wk before to 8 wk aftertreatment (11 wk total) by using CDC miniature light traps and human bait landing rates. In addition, bioassays were conducted on vegetation and wood surfaces to monitor residual activity. The two most common species in light trap collections were the Ross River Virus vectors Aedes vigilax (Skuse) and Culex annulirostris Skuse. After treatment, Ae. vigilax populations in treated properties were significantly lower (75–90%) compared with untreated properties. In contrast, Cx. annulirotris, Coquillettidia xanthogaster (Edwards) and Mansonia uniformis (Theobald) populations were not impacted by the treatment. Bioassays revealed that the product gave better residual mortality when applied to vegetation (94.6 ± 11.8%) than wooden surfaces (75.9 ± 29.1%) during the 8-wk posttreatment period.

© 2012 Entomological Society of America
Timothy P. Hurst, Peter A. Ryan, and Brian H. Kay "Efficacy of Residual Insecticide Biflex AquaMax Applied as Barrier Treatments for Managing Mosquito Populations in Suburban Residential Properties in Southeast Queensland," Journal of Medical Entomology 49(5), 1021-1026, (1 September 2012). https://doi.org/10.1603/ME11278
Received: 10 December 2011; Accepted: 1 April 2012; Published: 1 September 2012
JOURNAL ARTICLE
6 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top