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1 November 2012 Incidence of Bacteria of Public Health Interest Carried by Cockroaches in Different Food-Related Environments
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Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of bacteria of public health interest transmitted by cockroaches in different food-related environments. From April to November, cockroaches were trapped in 11 buildings in different urban areas of Western Andalusia (Spain): three hotels, four grocery stores, a catering establishment, a food-industry plant, a health center, and a care home. The presence of a number of bacterial species, including Salmonella, in these food-related environments was confirmed; these species included microorganisms listed in European Union regulations, such as Salmonella spp., Enterobacter sakazakii (Cronobacter spp.), and Escherichia coli. A wide variety of species were isolated, some belonging to different genera that have a significant impact on public health and hygiene, such as Enterobacter and Klebsiella. To ensure adequate elimination of these microorganisms in food-related environments, the control of vectors such as Blattella germanica, Periplaneta americana, and Blatta orientalis, together with a thorough review of hygiene strategies, appears to be fundamental. It is clearly essential to compare the results of hygiene regulations implemented in food-related environments.

© 2012 Entomological Society of America
F. García, M. J. Notario, J. M. Cabanás, R. Jordano, and L. M. Medina "Incidence of Bacteria of Public Health Interest Carried by Cockroaches in Different Food-Related Environments," Journal of Medical Entomology 49(6), 1481-1484, (1 November 2012). https://doi.org/10.1603/ME12007
Received: 16 January 2012; Accepted: 30 August 2012; Published: 1 November 2012
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