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1 January 2013 Ecology of Anopheline Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in the Central Atlantic Forest Biodiversity Corridor, Southeastern Brazil
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Abstract

Knowledge of the fauna composition of anopheline mosquitoes, their ecological aspects and behavior, and influence of climatic variables on their population dynamics can help in understanding the transmission of Plasmodium parasites and thus develop more efficient strategies for the control of malaria. In the Central Atlantic Forest Biodiversity Corridor, southeastern Brazil, foci of introduced malaria have been reported among people returning from the Amazon region, north Brazil. Our objective was to evaluate and compare the anopheline fauna from a preserved environment and an adjacent peridomiciliary modified environment at the Central Atlantic Forest Biodiversity Corridor. We collected anopheline mosquitoes on a monthly basis from June 2004 to May 2006 from both these environments to understand the ecological aspects and their association with the occurrence of malaria. We captured 5,491 anopheline mosquitoes belonging to two subgenera and 11 species and studied the correlations between anopheline mosquito species and climatic variables. We considered Anopheles darlingi (Root) as the principal malaria vector and Anopheles albitarsis s. l. (Arribalzaga) as the secondary vector.

© 2013 Entomological Society of America
Kleber S. da Silva, Israel de S. Pinto, Gustavo R. Leite, Thieres M. das Virgens, Claudiney B. dos Santos, and Aloísio Falqueto "Ecology of Anopheline Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in the Central Atlantic Forest Biodiversity Corridor, Southeastern Brazil," Journal of Medical Entomology 50(1), (1 January 2013). https://doi.org/10.1603/ME11219
Received: 5 October 2011; Accepted: 1 August 2012; Published: 1 January 2013
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