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1 April 2001 A COMPARISON OF BIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCES AMONG A LABORATORY-ISOLATED POPULATION AND TWO WILD POPULATIONS OF MONILIFORMIS MONILIFORMIS
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Abstract

Divergence of biological performance of a laboratory-reared population of Moniliformis moniliformis (Acanthocephala) was investigated after 31 yr, or approximately 60 generations, of genetic isolation. An isolate of the laboratory-reared population and isolates of 2 wild populations were used to begin 3 independent life cycles that were maintained for 1 generation for interbreeding and life history trait comparison. Both wild population isolates represented populations with open gene flow. One wild population isolate represented a present-day sample of descendants of the parent population of the laboratory isolate. All 3 populations hybridized, and egg production occurred in all mixed-sex pairs of different populations. The 3 populations did not differ significantly in prepatent period, mean daily egg production, or establishment within the definitive host Rattus norvegicus. The 3 populations varied in patent period, but the laboratory-isolated worms differed from the 2 wild population isolates no more than they did from each other. A positive correlation between mean daily egg production and duration of patent period resulted in different cumulative egg productions. A 31-yr period of isolation did not produce greater divergence in a laboratory population of M. moniliformis than occurs between wild populations with respect to the biological parameters measured.

Florian B. Reyda and Brent B. Nickol "A COMPARISON OF BIOLOGICAL PERFORMANCES AMONG A LABORATORY-ISOLATED POPULATION AND TWO WILD POPULATIONS OF MONILIFORMIS MONILIFORMIS," Journal of Parasitology 87(2), 330-338, (1 April 2001). https://doi.org/10.1645/0022-3395(2001)087[0330:ACOBPA]2.0.CO;2
Received: 1 February 2000; Accepted: 1 October 2000; Published: 1 April 2001
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