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1 June 2007 INTERSPECIFIC AND INTRASPECIFIC ASSOCIATIONS OF TWO SPECIES OF HARD TICKS, HAEMAPHYSALIS LONGICORNIS AND HAEMAPHYSALIS MEGASPINOSA, IN RELATION TO QUESTING SITE
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Abstract

The effects of intraspecific and interspecific interactions on preferred questing sites of ticks, specifically nymphs and larvae of Haemaphysalis longicornis and Haemaphysalis megaspinosa, were examined in Boso Peninsula of central Japan from October 1996 to September 1999. Haemaphysalis longicornis were primarily segregated from H. megaspinosa by season. All stages of the 2 tick species preferred sedges. Three-way contingency tables and log-linear models were used to test for independence of occurrence and to quantify associations between species and stages with similar host ranges. The shifts of questing site from leaves to stem tips and from 40–49 cm to greater heights were observed in both species, which suggests that these sites are more suitable for ticks and that aggregation may serve as protection from severe conditions. In contrast, a shift to a lower height was observed in H. longicornis nymphs and larvae when other species were present, suggesting that they were driven away by other species, especially H. megaspinosa. Heterospecific clusters composed of at least 2 species were formed on stem tips more frequently. It is concluded that questing site was affected by both aggregation pattern and the presence of other species.

Takashi Tsunoda "INTERSPECIFIC AND INTRASPECIFIC ASSOCIATIONS OF TWO SPECIES OF HARD TICKS, HAEMAPHYSALIS LONGICORNIS AND HAEMAPHYSALIS MEGASPINOSA, IN RELATION TO QUESTING SITE," Journal of Parasitology 93(3), 531-541, (1 June 2007). https://doi.org/10.1645/GE-982R.1
Received: 29 June 2006; Accepted: 1 December 2006; Published: 1 June 2007
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