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1 August 2007 HELMINTH COMMUNITIES IN FIVE SPECIES OF SYMPATRIC AMPHIBIANS FROM THREE ADJACENT EPHEMERAL PONDS IN SOUTHEASTERN WISCONSIN
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Abstract
Representatives of 5 amphibian species (313 individuals), including eastern American toads (Bufo americanus), wood frogs (Rana sylvatica), spring peepers (Pseudacris crucifer), blue-spotted salamanders (Ambystoma laterale), and central newts (Notophthalmus viridescens louisianensis), were collected from 3 ephemeral ponds during spring 1994, and they were inspected for helminth parasites. The component communities of anurans were more diverse than those of caudates. Infracommunities of all host species were isolationist and depauperate, due mostly to host ectothermy and low vagility. Toad infracommunities were dominated by skin-penetrating nematodes, and they had the highest values of mean total parasite abundance, mean species richness, and overall prevalence. This was likely due to their greater vagility compared with other host species. Infracommunities of wood frogs and blue-spotted salamanders had intermediate values for these measures of parasitism, whereas spring peeper and newt infracommunities had the lowest values. In addition to relative vagility, feeding habits and habitat preference were likely important in helminth community structure. Body size also seemed to play a role because mean wet weight of host species followed the same general trend as values of parasitism. However, effects of size were variable within host species and difficult to separate from other aspects of host ecology.
H. Randall Yoder and James R. Coggins "HELMINTH COMMUNITIES IN FIVE SPECIES OF SYMPATRIC AMPHIBIANS FROM THREE ADJACENT EPHEMERAL PONDS IN SOUTHEASTERN WISCONSIN," Journal of Parasitology 93(4), (1 August 2007). https://doi.org/10.1645/GE-1077R.1
Received: 29 September 2006; Accepted: 1 January 2007; Published: 1 August 2007
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