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1 December 2007 EXPERIMENTAL INFECTION OF CATTLE WITH A FELINE ISOLATE OF TRITRICHOMONAS FOETUS
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Abstract
Tritrichomonas foetus is the causative agent of bovine trichomoniasis, a sexually transmitted disease in cattle that can result in large profit losses for cattle producers. Increasing reports have suggested that T. foetus is also the causative agent of large-bowel diarrhea in cats. To determine if the trichomonads recovered from the reproductive tract of cattle and the large intestine of cats can thrive in the same host, 2 groups of virgin Angus heifers were inoculated with T. foetus. The first group of heifers was inoculated with a bovine T. foetus isolate cultured from a naturally infected cow, and heifers in the second group were inoculated with T. foetus organisms cultured from the feces of a naturally infected cat. Over an 11-wk period, vaginal, cervical, and uterine mucus samples were analyzed, along with a single transcervical uterine biopsy sample, to determine organism and disease presence. The mucus and biopsy samples collected from each group indicate that the disease caused by feline and bovine isolates of T. foetus are comparable, but not identical.
Heather Stockdale, Soren Rodning, Maurice Givens, David Carpenter, Stephen Lenz, Jennifer Spencer, Christine Dykstra, David Lindsay and Byron Blagburn "EXPERIMENTAL INFECTION OF CATTLE WITH A FELINE ISOLATE OF TRITRICHOMONAS FOETUS," Journal of Parasitology 93(6), (1 December 2007). https://doi.org/10.1645/GE-1305.1
Received: 24 April 2007; Accepted: 1 June 2007; Published: 1 December 2007
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