Translator Disclaimer
1 February 2011 Tests of Ecological Equivalence of Two Species of Terrestrial Gastropods as Second Intermediate Hosts of Panopistus pricei (Trematoda: Brachylaimidae)
Author Affiliations +
Abstract
Metacercariae of Panopistus pricei (Brachylaimidae) are common parasites of 2 species of terrestrial gastropods (Neohelix albolabris; Webbhelix multilineata) in southeastern Nebraska. Field data were collected to determine if individuals of N. albolabris and W. multilineata function as ecologically equivalent second intermediate hosts of P. pricei along a transect on the western edge of the Missouri River. Metacercariae were recovered and measured from samples of 30 snails of each species collected at each of 6 sites; whole kidneys from snails of both species were examined to quantify microhabitat use. Microhabitat use of P. pricei did not differ between host species; in both N. albolabris and W. multilineata, metacercariae were concentrated in the primary ureter and occurred throughout the kidney proper. Prevalences and mean abundances did not differ between host species at any site, nor did the relationship between parasite abundance and host size. Prevalences and mean abundances across sites were positively correlated between host species. At 2 sites, demographics of metacercariae differed between host species, suggesting short-term differences in the history of encounters with cercariae in the environment and differences in transmission to shrew definitive hosts. Overall, N. albolabris and W. multilineata appear to be equivalent and required second intermediate hosts of P. pricei in the area studied.
and Michael A. Barger "Tests of Ecological Equivalence of Two Species of Terrestrial Gastropods as Second Intermediate Hosts of Panopistus pricei (Trematoda: Brachylaimidae)," Journal of Parasitology 97(1), (1 February 2011). https://doi.org/10.1645/GE-2528.1
Received: 2 May 2010; Accepted: 1 June 2010; Published: 1 February 2011
JOURNAL ARTICLE
6 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top