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1 December 2006 The effect of host type on movement patterns of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) into and out of experimental huts in Thailand
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Abstract

Flight behavior studies were carried out from December 2004 through February 2005 at two sites in Thailand to compare the movement patterns of Aedes aegypti into and out of experimental huts baited with a human host, dog host, or without a host using a mark-release-recapture study design. Studies were conducted in isolated villages of Kanchanaburi and Chiang Mai Provinces, Thailand. In the presence of a human host only 4.9% (39/800) of the Ae. aegypti females departed the hut as compared to 46.5% (372/800) when a dog was present. There was no significant difference in the numbers of Ae. aegypti exiting when comparing dog to no host. A peak in exiting behavior in the absence of any host (human or dog) was observed between 1400–1700 h. Ingress behavior was much stronger when a human host was present in the hut with the peak of entering occurring in the morning (0830-1130 h) compared to 1000-1200 h without a host. Overall, significant differences between the two host types were observed with Ae. aegypti females being more attracted to humans (p< 0.05) than dogs. There was no significant difference between numbers of Ae. aegypti entering the hut baited with a dog and the hut containing no host source. The experimental hut design used in the present study can serve as a protocol for testing the exiting and entering behavior of Ae. aegypti in response to chemical compounds.

Wannapa Suwonkerd, Piti Mongkalangoon, Atchariya Parbaripai, John Grieco, Nicole Achee, Donald Roberts, and Theeraphap Chareonviriyaphap "The effect of host type on movement patterns of Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) into and out of experimental huts in Thailand," Journal of Vector Ecology 31(2), 311-318, (1 December 2006). https://doi.org/10.3376/1081-1710(2006)31[311:TEOHTO]2.0.CO;2
Received: 6 March 2006; Accepted: 30 June 2006; Published: 1 December 2006
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