Translator Disclaimer
1 December 2006 Influence of soil quality in the larval habitat on development of Anopheles gambiae Giles
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Larval ecology is an important aspect of the population dynamics of anopheline mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae), the vectors of malaria. Anopheles larvae live in pools of stagnant water and adult fitness may be correlated with the nutritional conditions under which larvae develop. A study was conducted in Mbita, Western Kenya, to investigate how properties of the soil substrate of Anopheles gambiae breeding pools can influence development of this mosquito species. An. gambiae eggs from an established colony were dispensed into experimental plastic troughs containing soil samples from a range of natural Anopheles larval habitats and filtered Lake Victoria water. The duration of larval development (8–15 days), pupation rate (0–79 %), and adult body size (20.28–26.91 mm3) varied among different soil types. The total organic matter (3.61–21.25%), organic carbon (0.63–7.18%), and total nitrogen (0.06–0.58%) levels of the soils were positively correlated with pupation rate and negatively correlated with development time and adult body size.

O. Pfaehler, D. O. Oulo, L. C. Gouagna, J. Githure, and P. M. Guerin "Influence of soil quality in the larval habitat on development of Anopheles gambiae Giles," Journal of Vector Ecology 31(2), 400-405, (1 December 2006). https://doi.org/10.3376/1081-1710(2006)31[400:IOSQIT]2.0.CO;2
Received: 1 March 2006; Accepted: 2 September 2006; Published: 1 December 2006
JOURNAL ARTICLE
6 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top