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1 December 2007 Effect of plant structure on oviposition behavior of Anopheles minimus s.l
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Abstract

Knowledge of factors that influence oviposition behavior of malaria mosquitoes is critical to vector control measures aimed at larval habitat modifications and source reduction. Anopheles minimus s.l., an important malaria vector in Southeast Asia, generally breeds in clear, unpolluted water along shaded grassy edges of slow-moving streams. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of vegetation and plant structure on An. minimus s.l. ovipositing females. Twenty gravid female mosquitoes per replication were given a choice to lay eggs in bowls surrounded by different combinations of bare soil, grasses, small-leaved plants, and large-leaved plants. An. minimus s.l. females generally preferred to lay eggs in bowls with vegetation. A significantly higher number of eggs were found in bowls with small-leaved plants compared to bowls with grasses (P<0.05). The results suggest that gravid females preferred oviposition habitats in the following order: small-leaved plants > large-leaved plants > grasses > soil. Further studies are needed to determine the possible roles of plant structure and factors such as semiochemicals in the different species of the An. minimus species complex. Knowledge of female oviposition behavior is essential for the development of locally adapted vector control approaches.

Hans J. Overgaard "Effect of plant structure on oviposition behavior of Anopheles minimus s.l," Journal of Vector Ecology 32(2), 193-197, (1 December 2007). https://doi.org/10.3376/1081-1710(2007)32[193:EOPSOO]2.0.CO;2
Received: 12 February 2007; Accepted: 15 May 2007; Published: 1 December 2007
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