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1 June 2015 Satellite-Derived NDVI, LST, and Climatic Factors Driving the Distribution and Abundance of Anopheles Mosquitoes in a Former Malarious Area in Northwest Argentina
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Abstract

Distribution and abundance of disease vectors are directly related to climatic conditions and environmental changes. Remote sensing data have been used for monitoring environmental conditions influencing spatial patterns of vector-borne diseases. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Land Surface Temperature (LST) obtained from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and climatic factors (temperature, humidity, wind velocity, and accumulated rainfall) on the distribution and abundance of Anopheles species in northwestern Argentina using Poisson regression analyses. Samples were collected from December, 2001 to December, 2005 at three localities, Aguas Blancas, El Oculto and San Ramón de la Nueva Orán. We collected 11,206 adult Anopheles species, with the major abundance observed at El Oculto (59.11%), followed by Aguas Blancas (22.10%) and San Ramón de la Nueva Orán (18.79%). Anopheles pseudopunctipennis was the most abundant species at El Oculto, Anopheles argyritarsis predominated in Aguas Blancas, and Anopheles strodei in San Ramón de la Nueva Orán. Samples were collected throughout the sampling period, with the highest peaks during the spring seasons. LST and mean temperature appear to be the most important variables determining the distribution patterns and major abundance of An. pseudopunctipennis and An. argyritarsis within malarious areas.

María Julia Dantur Juri, Elizabet Estallo, Walter Almirón, Mirta Santana, Paolo Sartor, Mario Lamfri, and Mario Zaidenberg "Satellite-Derived NDVI, LST, and Climatic Factors Driving the Distribution and Abundance of Anopheles Mosquitoes in a Former Malarious Area in Northwest Argentina," Journal of Vector Ecology 40(1), 36-45, (1 June 2015). https://doi.org/10.1111/jvec.12130
Received: 10 November 2014; Accepted: 1 July 2014; Published: 1 June 2015
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