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1 December 2000 THEROPOD TEETH FROM THE PRINCE CREEK FORMATION (CRETACEOUS) OF NORTHERN ALASKA, WITH SPECULATIONS ON ARCTIC DINOSAUR PALEOECOLOGY
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Abstract

Theropod teeth are taxonomically diagnostic components of dinosaur assemblages. Seventy teeth have been recovered from six different localities in the Kogosukruk Tongue of the Prince Creek Formation (Upper Cretaceous) of the North Slope of Alaska. This assemblage of teeth shows slightly less diversity compared to well documented assemblages of teeth from the slightly older Judith River Formation of south-central Montana, the Aguja Formation of west Texas, and the Hell Creek Formation of eastern Montana. In addition, in contrast to the Judith River Formation assemblage of teeth in south-central Montana, the teeth assigned to Troodon dominated the Alaskan assemblage. The dominance of Troodon is attributed to adaptation by this theropod to low light conditions while over-wintering at a high paleolatitude.

ANTHONY R. FIORILLO and ROLAND A. GANGLOFF "THEROPOD TEETH FROM THE PRINCE CREEK FORMATION (CRETACEOUS) OF NORTHERN ALASKA, WITH SPECULATIONS ON ARCTIC DINOSAUR PALEOECOLOGY," Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 20(4), 675-682, (1 December 2000). https://doi.org/10.1671/0272-4634(2000)020[0675:TTFTPC]2.0.CO;2
Received: 24 February 2000; Accepted: 11 July 2000; Published: 1 December 2000
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