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1 March 2001 CONSEQUENCES OF TRAUMATIC INJURY IN FOSSIL AND RECENT DIPNOAN DENTITIONS
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Abstract

Traumatic injury to the dentition of dipnoans, indirectly as a result of jaw fracture, or directly from damage to the tooth tissues, is present throughout the history of this group, in fossil and in Recent material. Bones heal, but traces of the injury are retained in the tooth tissues, permanently if the proliferative regions of the tooth plate are injured, or until the damaged dentines are removed by wear if the growing regions are left intact. Lack of resorption and repair of damaged dental hard tissues in dipnoans has implications for some models of tooth plate growth in lungfish with a permanent dentition, because this indicates that lungfish tooth plates may not have the capacity to form reparative dentine as part of the normal growth processes.

A. KEMP "CONSEQUENCES OF TRAUMATIC INJURY IN FOSSIL AND RECENT DIPNOAN DENTITIONS," Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 21(1), (1 March 2001). https://doi.org/10.1671/0272-4634(2001)021[0013:COTIIF]2.0.CO;2
Received: 27 August 1999; Accepted: 1 September 2000; Published: 1 March 2001
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