Translator Disclaimer
1 September 2004 FUNCTIONAL-ADAPTIVE ANALYSIS OF THE POSTCRANIAL SKELETON OF A LAVENTAN BORHYAENOID, LYCOPSIS LONGIROSTRIS (MARSUPIALIA, MAMMALIA)
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Lycopsis longirostris, a middle Miocene Colombian borhyaenoid, is compared functionally with early Miocene borhyaenoids from Patagonia and the Tasmanian thylacine Thylacinus cynocephalus, the largest Recent marsupial carnivore. The postcranium of Lycopsis shows a mosaic of features. Although several features characterizing the long bones are consistent with a primarily terrestrial mode of life (e.g., a straight ulna and tibia, a semi-digitigrade forefoot), other features like the development of mm. spinati, pectoralis and biceps and the pseudo-opposable pollex indicate that the forelimb had manipulative and grasping abilities. On the hindlimb, the poorly stabilized lower ankle joint, the short metatarsals, and the well-developed hallux also preclude fast running. When compared to three early Miocene borhyaenoids, Prothylacinus patagonicus, Cladosictis patagonica, and Borhyaena tuberata, which form a morphological gradient from the most arboreally-adapted taxon to an incipient cursorial one, Lycopsis is placed between Cladosictis and Borhyaena. Lycopsis was more likely an ambush hunter than a pounce-pursuit predator, stalking small-to medium-sized prey.

CHRISTINE ARGOT "FUNCTIONAL-ADAPTIVE ANALYSIS OF THE POSTCRANIAL SKELETON OF A LAVENTAN BORHYAENOID, LYCOPSIS LONGIROSTRIS (MARSUPIALIA, MAMMALIA)," Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 24(3), (1 September 2004). https://doi.org/10.1671/0272-4634(2004)024[0689:FAOTPS]2.0.CO;2
Received: 7 February 2002; Accepted: 3 November 2003; Published: 1 September 2004
JOURNAL ARTICLE
20 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top