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1 January 1981 ELAEOPHOROSIS IN BARBARY SHEEP AND MULE DEER FROM THE TEXAS PANHANDLE
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Abstract

Adult Elaeophora schneideri were recovered from the common carotid artery and its branches in 14 of 14 mule deer, Odocoileus hemionus, and 3 of 9 Barbary sheep or aoudads, Ammotragus lervia, from Palo Duro Canyon in the Texas Panhandle. Gross cutaneous lesions attributable to elaeophorosis in the Barbary sheep varied from small circumscribed scars up to 10 cm in diameter usually on the poll or orbital region to extensive proliferative irregular encrustations on the frontal, temporal and orbital regions, sometimes extending to the ears and muzzle. Individual lesions varied from slate-gray scarred areas to brown proliferative edematous and hyperemic encrustations, sometimes with depigmented pustules a few millimeters in diameter. Microscopic lesions ranged from granulation tissue to severe pyogranulomatous reactions with neutrophils, eosinophils, lymphocytes and plasma cells as the primary infiltration. Foreign body giant cells and/or microfilariae were not observed. Microscopic changes in the carotid arteries and their branches were limited to small villous projections on the intimal surface apparently resulting from medial hyperplasia. Cutaneous lesions attributable to elaeophorosis were not observed in mule deer. Histopathologic lesions in the carotid arteries of mule deer were similar to those observed in Barbary sheep. The comparative pathology of elaeophorosis in various hosts is reviewed and discussed in terms of its pathology in Barbary sheep. The potential ramifications of this infection on the expanding aoudad population in the southwestern United States require that elaeophorosis be considered in the management of this species, particularly in areas with sympatric mule deer populations.

PENCE and GRAY: ELAEOPHOROSIS IN BARBARY SHEEP AND MULE DEER FROM THE TEXAS PANHANDLE
DANNY B. PENCE and GARY G. GRAY "ELAEOPHOROSIS IN BARBARY SHEEP AND MULE DEER FROM THE TEXAS PANHANDLE," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 17(1), 49-56, (1 January 1981). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-17.1.49
Received: 25 April 1980; Published: 1 January 1981
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