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1 April 1986 LEAD EXPOSURE IN AN “URBAN” PEREGRINE FALCON AND ITS AVIAN PREY
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Abstract

Necropsy of a 7-yr-resident peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinis) from Baltimore showed a Pseudomonas infection involving the pharynx as the immediate cause of death. Concentrations of lead in liver and kidney measured 0.74 and 1.40 ppm, respectively. A survey of lead exposure was performed on 40 urban rock doves (Columba livia). Thirteen additional rock doves were collected from sites removed from lead contamination and served as controls. The mean concentration of lead in the blood of the urban rock doves was 0.96 ppm (range 0.29–17.0 ppm) compared to 0.05 ppm (0.01–0.07 ppm) for control birds. Ninety-eight percent (39/40) of the urban rock doves had elevated concentrations of lead in their blood, while 27% (11/40) had sublethal concentrations. None of the control birds had increased concentrations of lead in their blood. Concentrations of lead in liver and kidney of 13 urban rock doves were 3.48 ppm and 9.53 ppm, respectively, compared to concentrations of 0.43 ppm and 0.50 ppm for four control rock doves. From these data a mean total concentration of lead per rock dove was calculated at 4.60 ppm for urban birds and 0.33 ppm for control birds.

DeMent, Chisolm, Barber, and Strandberg: LEAD EXPOSURE IN AN “URBAN” PEREGRINE FALCON AND ITS AVIAN PREY
Samuel H. DeMent, J. Julian Chisolm Jr., John C. Barber, and John D. Strandberg "LEAD EXPOSURE IN AN “URBAN” PEREGRINE FALCON AND ITS AVIAN PREY," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 22(2), 238-244, (1 April 1986). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-22.2.238
Received: 29 April 1985; Published: 1 April 1986
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