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1 April 1992 BLOOD GAS AND CATECHOLAMINE LEVELS IN CAPTURE STRESSED DESERT BIGHORN SHEEP
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Abstract

Forty-seven bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni) were captured within a 3-day period in December, 1989 as part of a California Department of Fish and Game effort to repopulate historic ranges in California. They were captured on the Mojave Desert in the Kelso Mountains near Old Dad Peak, San Bernardino County, California. Venous blood gases measured at the site of capture demonstrated a severe metabolic acidosis (base deficit, 23 mEq/liter), with no evidence of respiratory acidosis. There were moderately elevated plasma epinephrine (1.25 ng/ml), norepinephrine (2.60 ng/ml), and dopamine (114 pg/ml) levels. These data appear to reflect animals that have been moderately stressed. These acid-base-catecholamine values differ from values in resting domestic sheep, and are similar to those reported in greyhounds after brief strenuous exercise.

Martucci, Jessup, Gronert, Reitan, and Clark: BLOOD GAS AND CATECHOLAMINE LEVELS IN CAPTURE STRESSED DESERT BIGHORN SHEEP
Richard W. Martucci, David A. Jessup, Gerald A. Gronert, John A. Reitan, and William E. Clark "BLOOD GAS AND CATECHOLAMINE LEVELS IN CAPTURE STRESSED DESERT BIGHORN SHEEP," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 28(2), 250-254, (1 April 1992). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-28.2.250
Received: 1 February 1991; Published: 1 April 1992
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