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1 July 1993 Phocine Distemper in Harbor Seals (Phoca vitulina) from Long Island, New York
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Abstract

The first occurrence of phocine distemper (PD) disease in harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) from the United States is reported. Two seals stranded on Long Island, New York (USA) in February 1992 with clinical signs of respiratory distress, fever, and depression. Pneumonia and diffuse pulmonary congestion were the most significant post mortem findings. On histologic examination one seal had a diffuse broncho-interstitial pneumonia with formation of syncytia. The principal lesion in the second animal was nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis. Using immunoperoxidase staining, PD viral antigen was found in the cytoplasm of bronchiolar epithelium and cerebral cortex neurons. With a differential virus neutralization test, there were higher titers against phocine distemper virus (PDV) than against canine distemper virus. Thus, PDV is the most likely agent responsible for the observed lesions.

Duignan, Sadove, Saliki, and Geraci: Phocine Distemper in Harbor Seals (Phoca vitulina) from Long Island, New York
Padraig J. Duignan, Samuel Sadove, Jeremiah T. Saliki, and Joseph R. Geraci "Phocine Distemper in Harbor Seals (Phoca vitulina) from Long Island, New York," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 29(3), 465-469, (1 July 1993). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-29.3.465
Received: 10 November 1992; Published: 1 July 1993
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