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1 April 1998 THE INITIAL IMPACT OF RABBIT HEMORRHAGIC DISEASE ON EUROPEAN RABBIT POPULATIONS IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA
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Abstract

The calicivirus agent for rabbit hemorrhagic disease (RHD) escaped from an island quarantine station to the Australian mainland in October 1995. Within 2 wk it was detected at an established field study site where wild European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) were being monitored in the Flinders Ranges National Park (South Australia, Australia). During November 1995, RHD reduced the rabbit numbers on the site by 95%. Approximately 3% of the population survived challenge by RHD and developed antibodies. Most of the antibody-positive survivors were 3- to 7-wk-old when challenged. Many rabbits died underground, but counts of rabbit carcasses found on the surface indicated that approximately 1 million rabbits had died above ground in the National Park, and that >30 million rabbits may have died in adjacent areas during the November epidemic.

Mutze, Cooke, and Alexander: THE INITIAL IMPACT OF RABBIT HEMORRHAGIC DISEASE ON EUROPEAN RABBIT POPULATIONS IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA
Greg Mutze, Brian Cooke, and Peter Alexander "THE INITIAL IMPACT OF RABBIT HEMORRHAGIC DISEASE ON EUROPEAN RABBIT POPULATIONS IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 34(2), 221-227, (1 April 1998). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-34.2.221
Received: 9 April 1997; Published: 1 April 1998
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