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1 July 2001 MINERAL AND HEAVY METAL STATUS AS RELATED TO A MORTALITY EVENT AND POOR RECRUITMENT IN A MOOSE POPULATION IN ALASKA
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Abstract

Moose (Alces alces) found dead (FD) and hunter-killed (HK) in 1995 on the north slope of Alaska (USA) in the Colville River Drainage were evaluated for heavy metal and mineral status. Compared to previous reports for moose and domestic cattle, and data presented here from Alaska moose outside the Colville River area, levels of Cu were determined to be low in hoof, hair, liver, kidney, rumen contents, and muscle for these north slope moose. Iron (Fe) was low in muscle as well. These findings, in conjunction with evidence of poor calf survival and adult mortality prompted investigation of a mineral deficiency in moose (serum, blood, and hair) captured in the spring of 1996 and 1997. Captured males had higher Ca, Zn and Cu levels in hair than captured females. Female moose hair samples were determined to be low (deficient) in Cu, Ca, Fe, and Se with mean levels (ppm) of 2.77, 599.7, 37.4, and 0.30, respectively. Serum Cu level was low, and to a lesser degree Zn was deficient as well. Whole blood (1997 only) was marginally deficient in Se and all animals were deficient in Cu. Based on whole blood, sera and hair, Cu levels were considered low for moose captured in spring 1996 and 1997 in the Colville River area as compared to published data and other populations evaluated in this study. Low levels of ceruloplasmin activity support this Cu deficiency theory. Evidence indicates that these moose are deficient in Cu and other minerals; however, the remote location precluded sufficient examination of animals to associate this apparent deficiency with direct effects or lesions. Renal levels of Cd increased with age at expected levels.

Todd M. O'Hara, Geoff Carroll, Perry Barboza, Keith Mueller, John Blake, Victoria Woshner, and Carla Willetto "MINERAL AND HEAVY METAL STATUS AS RELATED TO A MORTALITY EVENT AND POOR RECRUITMENT IN A MOOSE POPULATION IN ALASKA," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 37(3), 509-522, (1 July 2001). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-37.3.509
Received: 19 November 1999; Published: 1 July 2001
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