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1 October 2004 SEROLOGIC SURVEY FOR SELECTED DISEASE AGENTS IN WOLVES (CANIS LUPUS) FROM ALASKA AND THE YUKON TERRITORY, 1984–2000
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Abstract

Wolves (SCanis lupus) were captured in several geographic areas of Alaska (USA) and the Yukon Territory (Canada) during 1984–2000. Blood was collected from 1,122 animals. Sera were tested for antibodies against infectious canine hepatitis virus (ICH), canine distemper virus (CDV), canine parvovirus (CPV), Francisella tularensis, and serovars of Leptospira interrogans. Antibody prevalence for ICH was >84% for all areas. Area-specific prevalences of antibodies ranged from 12% to 70% for CPV, from 0% to 41% for CDV, and from 4% to 21% for F. tularensis. There was no evidence of CDV exposure at the two southernmost locations in Alaska. Prevalence of antibodies for ICH increased slightly during the 16-yr course of the survey. There was essentially no evidence of exposure to L. interrogans. Prevalences of antibodies for both CPV and CDV were age-specific, with higher values in the adult cohort compared with the pup cohort. There were no sex-specific differences in prevalence of antibodies for any of the five disease agents.

Randall L. Zarnke, Jay M. Ver Hoef, and Robert A. DeLong "SEROLOGIC SURVEY FOR SELECTED DISEASE AGENTS IN WOLVES (CANIS LUPUS) FROM ALASKA AND THE YUKON TERRITORY, 1984–2000," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 40(4), 632-638, (1 October 2004). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-40.4.632
Received: 3 April 2002; Published: 1 October 2004
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