Translator Disclaimer
1 July 1969 SOME OBSERVATIONS ON DOMESTIC SHEEP AND WILDLIFE RELATIONSHIPS IN Q-FEVER
Author Affiliations +
Abstract
A cycle of prevalence of Q-fever antibodies in sheep is confirmed, and possible relationships between sheep, wild mammals and birds in the ecology of Q-fever are exhibited. Carnivores and carrion-eaters, including coyotes (Canis latrans), turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), grey foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), and hawks [Red-tailed hawk (Buteo borealis) and Sparrow hawk (Falco sparverius)] have serological evidence of Q-fever indicating exposure relative to their food habits. Herbivorous mammals and birds have evidence of Q-fever exposure relative to their relationship with sheep: species that share the same pastures as the sheep have a higher percentage with Q-fever antibodies than species inhabiting the protective underbrush or species that are more independent of the activities of livestock. A detailed study of 5 representative wildlife species, including the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), black - tailed jackrabbit (Lepus californicus), Columbian black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus), ground squirrel (Citellus beecheyi), and the common red-wing blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) indicated that the blackbird has a peak prevalence of antibodies before that of sheep, the black-tailed jackrabbit and the ground squirrel seem to parallel sheep in cyclic responses, and the peak prevalence of Q-fever antibodies in the deer mouse occurs after the peak response in sheep. Deer responses appear to be unrelated to sheep responses.
J. B. ENRIGHT, W. LONGHURST, C. E. FRANTI, M. E. WRIGHT, V. J. DUTSON and D. E. BEHYMER "SOME OBSERVATIONS ON DOMESTIC SHEEP AND WILDLIFE RELATIONSHIPS IN Q-FEVER 1," Bulletin of the Wildlife Disease Association 5(3), (1 July 1969). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-5.3.276
JOURNAL ARTICLE
8 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top