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1 October 2014 EVALUATION OF MEDETOMIDINE-KETAMINE AND MEDETOMIDINE-KETAMINE-BUTORPHANOL FOR THE FIELD ANESTHESIA OF FREE-RANGING DROMEDARY CAMELS (CAMELUS DROMEDARIUS) IN AUSTRALIA
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Abstract

We report the clinical course and physiologic and anesthetic data for a case series of 76 free-ranging dromedary camels (Camelus dromedarius) chemically restrained, by remote injection from a helicopter, in the rangelands of Western Australia and South Australia, 2008–11, to attach satellite-tracking collars. Fifty-five camels were successfully anesthetized using medetomidine-ketamine (MK, n = 27) and medetomidine-ketamine-butorphanol (MKB, n = 28); the induction of anesthesia in 21 animals was considered unsuccessful. To produce reliable anesthesia for MK, medetomidine was administered at 0.22 mg/kg (±SD = 0.05) and ketamine at 2.54 mg/kg (±0.56), and for MKB, medetomidine was administered at 0.12 mg/kg (±0.05), ketamine at 2.3 mg/kg (±0.39), and butorphanol at 0.05 mg/kg (±0.02). Median time-to-recumbency for MKB (8.5 min) was 2.5 min shorter than for MK (11 min) (P = 0.13). For MK, the reversal atipamezole was administered at 0.24 mg/kg (±0.10), and for MKB, atipamezole was administered at 0.23 mg/kg (±0.13) and naltrexone at 0.17 mg/kg (±0.16). Median time-to-recovery was 1 min shorter for MK (5 min) than MKB (6 min; P = 0.02). Physiologic parameters during recumbency were not clinically different between the two regimes. Both regimes were suitable to safely anesthetize free-ranging camels; however, further investigation is required to find the safest, most consistent, and logistically practical combination.

Wildlife Disease Association 2014
Wayne S. J. Boardman, Mark R. Lethbridge, Jordan O. Hampton, Ian Smith, Andrew P. Woolnough, Margaret-Mary McEwen, Graham W. J. Miller, and Charles G. B. Caraguel "EVALUATION OF MEDETOMIDINE-KETAMINE AND MEDETOMIDINE-KETAMINE-BUTORPHANOL FOR THE FIELD ANESTHESIA OF FREE-RANGING DROMEDARY CAMELS (CAMELUS DROMEDARIUS) IN AUSTRALIA," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 50(4), (1 October 2014). https://doi.org/10.7589/2014-03-059
Received: 5 March 2014; Accepted: 1 March 2014; Published: 1 October 2014
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