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1 January 2015 IN OVO AND IN VITRO SUSCEPTIBILITY OF AMERICAN ALLIGATORS (ALLIGATOR MISSISSIPPIENSIS) TO AVIAN INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTION
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Abstract

Avian influenza has emerged as one of the most ubiquitous viruses within our biosphere. Wild aquatic birds are believed to be the primary reservoir of all influenza viruses; however, the spillover of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) and the recent swine-origin pandemic H1N1 viruses have sparked increased interest in identifying and understanding which and how many species can be infected. Moreover, novel influenza virus sequences were recently isolated from New World bats. Crocodilians have a slow rate of molecular evolution and are the sister group to birds; thus they are a logical reptilian group to explore susceptibility to influenza virus infection and they provide a link between birds and mammals. A primary American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) cell line, and embryos, were infected with four, low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) strains to assess susceptibility to infection. Embryonated alligator eggs supported virus replication, as evidenced by the influenza virus M gene and infectious virus detected in allantoic fluid and by virus antigen staining in embryo tissues. Primary alligator cells were also inoculated with the LPAI viruses and showed susceptibility based upon antigen staining; however, the requirement for trypsin to support replication in cell culture limited replication. To assess influenza virus replication in culture, primary alligator cells were inoculated with H1N1 human influenza or H5N1 HPAI viruses that replicate independent of trypsin. Both viruses replicated efficiently in culture, even at the 30 C temperature preferred by the alligator cells. This research demonstrates the ability of wild-type influenza viruses to infect and replicate within two crocodilian substrates and suggests the need for further research to assess crocodilians as a species potentially susceptible to influenza virus infection.

Wildlife Disease Association 2015
Bradley L. Temple, John W. Finger Jr., Cheryl A. Jones, Jon D. Gabbard, Tomislav Jelesijevic, Elizabeth W. Uhl, Robert J. Hogan, Travis C. Glenn, and S. Mark Tompkins "IN OVO AND IN VITRO SUSCEPTIBILITY OF AMERICAN ALLIGATORS (ALLIGATOR MISSISSIPPIENSIS) TO AVIAN INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTION," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 51(1), 187-198, (1 January 2015). https://doi.org/10.7589/2013-12-321
Received: 10 August 2013; Accepted: 1 August 2014; Published: 1 January 2015
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