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1 April 2015 PRESENTATION AND PROGNOSTIC INDICATORS FOR FREE-LIVING BLACK COCKATOOS (CALYPTORHYNCHUS SPP.) ADMITTED TO AN AUSTRALIAN ZOO VETERINARY HOSPITAL OVER 10 YEARS
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Abstract

The veterinary records of three species of free-living, endangered black cockatoos (Calyptorhynchus spp.; n = 565) admitted to the Perth Zoo Veterinary Hospital in Western Australia during a 10-yr period (2000–09) were analyzed to determine the effect of clinical presentation and treatment on survival to release. The most-common reason for admission was trauma (at least 76.7% of cases), and trauma was also the most-frequent finding on necropsy examination (80.1% of cases). Anemia and paralysis-paresis were significant factors determining the decreased likelihood of survival of cockatoos undergoing rehabilitation. Human activities, in particular vehicle strike, were significant causes of morbidity and mortality in free-living black cockatoo populations.

Wildlife Disease Association 2015
Anna Le Souëf, Carly Holyoake, Simone Vitali, and Kristin Warren "PRESENTATION AND PROGNOSTIC INDICATORS FOR FREE-LIVING BLACK COCKATOOS (CALYPTORHYNCHUS SPP.) ADMITTED TO AN AUSTRALIAN ZOO VETERINARY HOSPITAL OVER 10 YEARS," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 51(2), (1 April 2015). https://doi.org/10.7589/2014-08-203
Received: 19 August 2014; Accepted: 1 October 2014; Published: 1 April 2015
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