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1 July 2015 Collection and Utilization of Animal Carcasses Associated with zoonotic Disease in Tshuapa District, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, 2012
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Abstract

The collection and consumption of animal carcasses is a common activity in forested areas of the Congo River basin and creates sustainability, conservation, and health concerns. Residents of the Tshuapa District reported collecting the remains of 5,878 animals from >30 species when surveyed about their wildlife consumption habits. Carcasses were discovered in varying degrees of decomposition and were often consumed at home or sold in local markets. The most commonly collected animals were Cricetomys gambianus (Northern giant pouched rat), Cercopithecus ascanius (red-tailed monkey), and Heliosciurus rufobrachium (red-legged sun squirrel). Many of the species recorded may be hosts of zoonotic pathogens, creating concern for spillover events.

© Wildlife Disease Association 2015
Benjamin P. Monroe, Jeffrey B. Doty, Cynthia Moses, Saturnin Ibata, Mary Reynolds, and Darin Carroll "Collection and Utilization of Animal Carcasses Associated with zoonotic Disease in Tshuapa District, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, 2012," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 51(3), (1 July 2015). https://doi.org/10.7589/2014-05-140
Received: 29 May 2014; Accepted: 1 January 2015; Published: 1 July 2015
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