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1 July 2016 PREVALENCE OF ANTIBODIES TO SELECTED VIRUSES AND PARASITES IN INTRODUCED AND ENDEMIC CARNIVORES IN WESTERN MADAGASCAR
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Abstract

Introduced animals impact endemic populations through predation, competition, and disease transmission. Populations of endemic carnivores in Madagascar are declining, and pathogens transmitted from introduced species may further endanger these unique species. We assessed the exposure of introduced and endemic carnivores to common viral and parasitic pathogens in two national parks of Madagascar (Kirindy Mitea National Park and Ankarafantsika National Park) and their neighboring villages. We also identified variables associated with the presence of antibodies to these pathogens in fosa (Cryptoprocta ferox). Introduced and endemic species were exposed to canine parvovirus, canine herpesvirus, feline calicivirus, and Toxoplasma gondii. Domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) and cats (Felis catus) may be sources of infection for these pathogens. Prevalence of antibodies to Toxoplasma in captured fosa was >93%, and adults were more likely to be exposed than immature individuals. Our data provide a basis upon which to evaluate and manage risks of pathogen transmission between species.

Julie Pomerantz, Fidisoa T. Rasambainarivo, Luke Dollar, Leon Pierrot Rahajanirina, Radosoa Andrianaivoarivelo, Patricia Parker, and Edward Dubovi "PREVALENCE OF ANTIBODIES TO SELECTED VIRUSES AND PARASITES IN INTRODUCED AND ENDEMIC CARNIVORES IN WESTERN MADAGASCAR," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 52(3), 544-552, (1 July 2016). https://doi.org/10.7589/2015-03-063
Received: 17 March 2015; Accepted: 1 February 2016; Published: 1 July 2016
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