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9 October 2019 Carriage of Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Antimicrobial-Resistant, Nonspecific Escherichia coli by Waterfowl Species Collected from Three Sources in Southern Ontario, Canada
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Abstract

Wild birds are considered a potential source of zoonotic pathogens. We report on the occurrence of Campylobacter, Salmonella, and antimicrobial-resistant, nonspecific Escherichia coli in ducks, grebes, and swans obtained by convenience while conducting related research with Canada Geese (Branta canadensis). Samples were obtained in southern Ontario, Canada, between 2013 and 2015 from hunter-caught birds, birds submitted for postmortem diagnosis, and fresh feces from live birds in parks. A secondary objective was to characterize Campylobacter genotypes using comparative genomic fingerprinting. Salmonella and E. coli isolates were tested for susceptibility to 15 antimicrobials using the Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance test panel. A total of 71 samples were collected from 15 different waterfowl species. We detected Campylobacter, Salmonella, and E. coli in 17, 3, and 84% of samples, respectively. Ten unique Campylobacter subtypes were identified, some of which had been identified previously in water, poultry, waterfowl, and human clinical cases. Both Salmonella isolates were pansusceptible and 15% of E. coli isolates were resistant to at least one antimicrobial, including resistance to antimicrobials of highest importance to human health. Source attribution studies should examine the role of waterfowl in the dissemination of these pathogens.

© Wildlife Disease Association 2019
Nadine A. Vogt, David L. Pearl, Eduardo N. Taboada, Steven K. Mutschall, Nicol Janecko, Richard J. Reid-Smith, and Claire M. Jardine "Carriage of Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Antimicrobial-Resistant, Nonspecific Escherichia coli by Waterfowl Species Collected from Three Sources in Southern Ontario, Canada," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 55(4), 917-922, (9 October 2019). https://doi.org/10.7589/2018-12-288
Received: 13 December 2018; Accepted: 9 March 2018; Published: 9 October 2019
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