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1 February 2007 Probability of Detecting Band-Tailed Pigeons During Call-Broadcast Versus Auditory Surveys
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Abstract

Estimates of population trend for the interior subspecies of band-tailed pigeon (Patagioenas fasciata fasciata) are not available because no standardized survey method exists for monitoring the interior subspecies. We evaluated 2 potential band-tailed pigeon survey methods (auditory and call-broadcast surveys) from 2002 to 2004 in 5 mountain ranges in southern Arizona, USA, and in mixed-conifer forest throughout the state. Both auditory and call-broadcast surveys produced low numbers of cooing pigeons detected per survey route ( ≤ 0.67) and had relatively high temporal variance in average number of cooing pigeons detected during replicate surveys (CV ≥ 161%). However, compared to auditory surveys, use of call-broadcast increased 1) the percentage of replicate surveys on which ≥1 cooing pigeon was detected by an average of 16%, and 2) the number of cooing pigeons detected per survey route by an average of 29%, with this difference being greatest during the first 45 minutes of the morning survey period. Moreover, probability of detecting a cooing pigeon was 27% greater during call-broadcast (0.80) versus auditory (0.63) surveys. We found that cooing pigeons were most common in mixed-conifer forest in southern Arizona and density of male pigeons in mixed-conifer forest throughout the state averaged 0.004 (SE = 0.001) pigeons/ha. Our results are the first to show that call-broadcast increases the probability of detecting band-tailed pigeons (or any species of Columbidae) during surveys. Call-broadcast surveys may provide a useful method for monitoring populations of the interior subspecies of band-tailed pigeon in areas where other survey methods are inappropriate.

CHRIS KIRKPATRICK, COURTNEY J. CONWAY, KATIE M. HUGHES, and JAMES C. DEVOS "Probability of Detecting Band-Tailed Pigeons During Call-Broadcast Versus Auditory Surveys," Journal of Wildlife Management 71(1), 231-237, (1 February 2007). https://doi.org/10.2193/2005-493
Published: 1 February 2007
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